ADHD

ADHD is a disorder that makes it difficult for a person to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors. He or she may also be restless and almost constantly active.

People with ADHD show an ongoing pattern of three different types of symptoms:

  • Difficulty paying attention (inattention)

  • Being overactive (hyperactivity)

  • Acting without thinking (impulsivity)

ADHD is not just a childhood disorder. Although the symptoms of ADHD begin in childhood, ADHD can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Even though hyperactivity tends to improve as a child becomes a teen, problems with inattention, disorganization, and poor impulse control often continue through the teen years and into adulthood.

BIPOLAR DISORDER

Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, concentration, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.

There are three types of bipolar disorder. All three types involve clear changes in mood, energy, and activity levels. These moods range from periods of extremely “up,” elated, irritable, or energized behavior (known as manic episodes) to very “down,” sad, indifferent, or hopeless periods (known as depressive episodes). Less severe manic periods are known as hypomanic episodes.

  • Bipolar I Disorder 

  • Bipolar II Disorder 

  • Cyclothymic Disorder (also called Cyclothymia)

OCD

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic, and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and/or behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over.

People with OCD may have symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both. These symptoms can interfere with all aspects of life, such as work, school, and personal relationships.

Obsessions are repeated thoughts, urges, or mental images that cause anxiety. 

Compulsions are repetitive behaviors that a person with OCD feels the urge to do in response to an obsessive thought

schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may seem like they have lost touch with reality, which causes significant distress for the individual, their family members, and friends. If left untreated, the symptoms of schizophrenia can be persistent and disabling. However, effective treatments are available. When delivered in a timely, coordinated, and sustained manner, treatment can help affected individuals to engage in school or work, achieve independence, and enjoy personal relationships.

 

Gradual changes in thinking, mood, and social functioning often begin before the first episode of psychosis. 

 

The symptoms of schizophrenia generally fall into the following three categories:

  • Psychotic symptoms

  • Negative symptoms

  • Cognitive symptoms

medication management

Medications are an important part of effective treatment for many mental health conditions. The decision to start or to continue psychiatric medications is not one to be taken lightly. Our approach to psychopharmacology (or “medication management”) is designed to respect your individuality and to acknowledge the complexity of this intervention.

 

First and foremost, effective medication management takes time. A detailed history and ongoing discussion of your response to medications is essential to providing excellent care.

Furthermore, when starting or adjusting medications, we request that you return frequently to be sure that the interventions are effective. We will weigh you regularly and may check your blood pressure or request additional laboratory tests to monitor your reaction to medications.

Most people who benefit from psychiatric medications do best when the medication management is combined with psychotherapy. 

ANXIETY

Occasional anxiety is an expected part of life. You might feel anxious when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision. But anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time. The symptoms can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, school work, and relationships.

 

There are several types of anxiety disorders, including:

  • Generalized anxiety disorder

  • Obsessive compulsive disorder

  • Panic disorder

  • Various phobia-related disorders​​

Depression

Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. To be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.

Some forms of depression are slightly different, or they may develop under unique circumstances, such as:

  • Persistent depressive disorder (also called dysthymia) 

  • Postpartum depression is much more serious than the “baby blues”

  • Psychotic depression 

  • Seasonal affective disorder 

  • Bipolar disorder (mania or hypomania)

PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disorder that develops in some people who have experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event.

 

It is natural to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation. Fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to help defend against danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response is a typical reaction meant to protect a person from harm. Nearly everyone will experience a range of reactions after trauma, yet most people recover from initial symptoms naturally. Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD. People who have PTSD may feel stressed or frightened, even when they are not in danger.

Not everyone with PTSD has been through a dangerous event. Some experiences, like the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one, can also cause PTSD.

therapy

Psychotherapy is a term for a variety of treatment techniques that aim to help a person identify and change troubling emotions, thoughts, and behavior. 

Psychotherapy can be an alternative to medication or can be used along with other treatment options, such as medications. Choosing the right treatment plan should be based on a person's individual needs and medical situation and under a mental health professional’s care.

Even when medications relieve symptoms, psychotherapy and other interventions can help a person address specific issues. These might include self-defeating ways of thinking, fears, problems with interactions with other people, or dealing with situations at home and at school or with employment.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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770.765.3556

4343 Shallowford Road Suite 530,

Marietta, Georgia 30062